eduf.net

Home of Eduardo Fernandes (eduf), an independent writer and content strategist from Brazil.

“Links that were considered to be the result of spamming activities led to a reduction in the PR of the receiving page. This clearly and obviously changes the incentives faced by those who have been spamming. Firstly, it will, over time, reduce the amount of new spam created. It might take some time for the spammers aren’t necessarily the brightest group on the planet but it will happen. And what is also happening, as the Awl describes and as Joshua now recommends people do, is that people are trawling through the links to their sites and then trying to remove those old spammy ones that are reducing their Google PR.”

How Google Is Cleaning The Web Of Comment Spam - Forbes

Introducing Pocket 5.0. Yeah, It’s marketing small talking, but not only that. Pocket’s CEO Nate Weiner explains the thinking and data behind the development of the new app. There are some good insights on content strategy, UX and content consuming.

Do you like Facebook? Watch this one: Mike Monteiro on “How Designers Destroyed the World”

We check in with a few of our Theory Of Everything regulars: Peter Choyce has is one of my oldest friends and a listener favorite, but he has a secret we’ve never addressed until now. We also check in with our D.C. correspondent ”Chris” who tells us about the NSA’s desire to install backdoors in Podcasts. Also, I tell you the story about what happens when I wander into @ psychic for a late night reading. PLUS: a few extracts from ‘Brand New World’

odditiesoflife:

Amazing Ancient Ruins of the Pueblo People

Ancient Pueblo people were an ancient Native American culture centered on the present-day Four Corners area of the United States, comprising southern Utah, northeastern Arizona, northern New Mexico, and southwestern Colorado. Archaeologists still debate when this distinct culture emerged but the current consensus is around 12th century BC.

They lived in a range of structures, including pit houses, pueblos, and cliff dwellings designed so that they could lift entry ladders during enemy attacks, which provided security. The pictures above feature some of the amazing pueblos and cliff dwellings of these people. The most photographed ruin is the “House on Fire” (picture 1). This ruin, when captured at certain times of the day, resembles a dwelling on fire and is a favorite among photographers.

  • "House on Fire" ruin in Mule Canyon, South Fork, Utah
  • Petroglyph with the prehistoric symbol, flute player Kokopelli
  • Multistory dwellings at Bandelier. Rock wall foundations and beam holes and “cavates” carved into volcanic tuff remain from upper floors
  • Laguna Pueblo dwellers posing for a picture
  • Doorways, Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico
  • Casa Rinconada, Chaco Culture National Historical Park, New Mexico
  • Ancestral Pueblo ruins in Dark Canyon Wilderness, Utah
  • Cliff Palace, Mesa Verde National Park

sources 1, 2, 3

webofhistory:


Pasquale Taraffo and his harp guitar.  Born in Italy, Taraffo traveled the world playing his harp guitar, a 14 stringed instrument mounted on a pedestal.  You can hear him play “Stefania,’ one of his most popular pieces, here.

webofhistory:

Pasquale Taraffo and his harp guitar.  Born in Italy, Taraffo traveled the world playing his harp guitar, a 14 stringed instrument mounted on a pedestal.  You can hear him play “Stefania,’ one of his most popular pieces, here.